“You get what you need when you need it”: A mixed methods examination of the feasibility and acceptability of a tailored digital tool to promote physical activity among women in midlife

Danielle Arigo, Jonathan Mathias Lassiter, Kiri Baga, Daija A. Jackson, Andrea F. Lobo, Timothy C. Guetterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During midlife (ages 40–60), women experience myriad changes that elevate their risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including decreased physical activity (PA). Women cite lack of social support for PA and lack of active peers who can serve as role models as key barriers. Digital tools such as web applications can provide exposure to these social inputs; they are also accessible in daily life and require modest time investment. However, as few tools have been designed to meet the unique needs of women in midlife with CVD risk, our research team previously built a web application that is tailored for this population. In the present study, we used a convergent mixed methods design to develop a deep understanding of the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of this web application in a sample of identified end users. Participants (N = 27, MAge = 53 years, MBMI = 32.6 kg/m2) used the web application at the start of each day for 7 days and completed a 1-hour qualitative interview at the end of this test period. Integration of findings from two-level multilevel models (quantitative) and thematic analysis (qualitative) indicated support for the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of the new web application among women in midlife with CVD risk conditions and identified critical opportunities for improving the user experience. Findings also speak to the utility of options for content selection that can meet women's needs in daily life and highlight women's desire for PA resources that prioritize their perspectives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDigital Health
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Information Management

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