"What have we GANEd?" A theoretical construct to explain experimental evidence for noradrenergic regulation of sensory signal processing

Rachel Navarra, Barry Waterhouse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The GANE (glutamate amplifies noradrenergic effects) theory posits a mechanism for amplifying noradrenergic modulatory actions and enhancing the processing of high-priority sensory signals for immediate or future experience-guided action. This theoretical construct is thought provoking with respect to the central processing of high-priority versus low-priority stimuli, but it requires some refinement to account for physiological fluctuations in NE efflux as a function of naturally occurring transitions in behavioral state and the experimentally observed phenomena associated with noradrenergic regulation of sensory signal transfer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e219
JournalThe Behavioral and brain sciences
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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