To err is human, to monitor divine: Environmental adaptations reduce everyday errors but do not improve monitoring

Brianne Magouirk Bettcher, Tania Giovannetti, Elizabeth Klobusicky, Denene Wambach, Joel Eppig, David J. Libon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study aimed to address error monitoring impairments in dementia using an intervention for execution deficits. Thirty-eight participants completed the Naturalistic Action Test (NAT) under two conditions: Standard and User-Centered. The Standard NAT followed the manual procedures; in the User-Centered NAT, objects were arranged sequentially, and distractor items were separated from target objects. While participants committed fewer errors in the User-Centered condition, there was no difference in the proportion of errors detected. However, the neuropsychological processes associated with monitoring differed across conditions. The results have implications for a neuropsychological model of error monitoring in dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1049-1058
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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