Third Spaces: Turkish Immigrants and Their Children at the Intersection of Identity, Schooling, and Culture

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Abstract

This qualitative case study utilized hybridity theory, particularly the notion of third spaces, to investigate the ways Turkish immigrants (18 parents and 15 children) negotiate culture, identity, and schooling in the midwestern United States. Data were collected through in-depth interviews, observations, and artifacts, and analyzed using traditional qualitative analysis tools. The findings demonstrated that Turkish immigrants' identity negotiation in third spaces included five elements: (1) drawing from multiple discourses, (2) navigating geo-cultural spaces, (3) becoming agents of negotiation, (4) mediating conflicts, and (5) regenerating traditions. These findings have several implications. Educators should understand the importance of out-of-school experiences that highlight the agency of immigrant children and their families so they can better support the children's academic and social growth. Further, educators and policymakers should rethink the notion of "immigration" and the traditional role of schools in this process as these may not reflect the complexity of contemporary immigrant identities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-144
Number of pages18
JournalDiaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Education

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