THink: Inferring cognitive status from subtle behaviors

Randall Davis, David J. Libon, Rhoda Au, David Pitman, Dana L. Penney

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Digital Clock Drawing Test is a fielded application that provides a major advance over existing neuropsychological testing technology. It captures and analyzes high precision information about both outcome and process, opening up the possibility of detecting subtle cognitive impairment even when test results appear superficially normal. We describe the design and development of the test, document the role of AI in its capabilities, and report on its use over the past seven years. We outline its potential implications for earlier detection and treatment of neurological disorders. We also set the work in the larger context of the THink project, which is exploring multiple approaches to determining cognitive status through the detection and analysis of subtle behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence
PublisherAI Access Foundation
Pages2898-2905
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781577356806
StatePublished - 2014
Event28th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2014, 26th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, IAAI 2014 and the 5th Symposium on Educational Advances in Artificial Intelligence, EAAI 2014 - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: Jul 27 2014Jul 31 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Volume4

Other

Other28th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2014, 26th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, IAAI 2014 and the 5th Symposium on Educational Advances in Artificial Intelligence, EAAI 2014
CountryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period7/27/147/31/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Artificial Intelligence

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