The relationship between cellular phone use, performance, and reaction time among college students: Implications for cellular phone use while driving

Adam Szyfman, Gregory Wanner, Leslie Spencer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies were performed to determine the relationship between cellular phone use and either reaction time or performance among college students. In the first study 60 undergraduates completed a computerized reaction time test. Mean reaction times were significantly higher when participants were talking on a cellular phone, either handheld or on a headset, than when they were not. In the second study 40 undergraduates steered a remote-controlled car through an obstacle course. Performance scores were significantly poorer for participants when they were talking on a cellular phone than when they were not. A majority of participants reported using cellular phones while driving, yet believed this was a dangerous practice. We recommend incorporation of education about cellular phone use and driving in health/safety curriculums for high school and college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-83
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Education
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

Cell Phones
Students
performance
student
curriculum
Curriculum
health
school
time
education
Safety
Education
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{de239a4744f3462781a58ecc5b740308,
title = "The relationship between cellular phone use, performance, and reaction time among college students: Implications for cellular phone use while driving",
abstract = "Two studies were performed to determine the relationship between cellular phone use and either reaction time or performance among college students. In the first study 60 undergraduates completed a computerized reaction time test. Mean reaction times were significantly higher when participants were talking on a cellular phone, either handheld or on a headset, than when they were not. In the second study 40 undergraduates steered a remote-controlled car through an obstacle course. Performance scores were significantly poorer for participants when they were talking on a cellular phone than when they were not. A majority of participants reported using cellular phones while driving, yet believed this was a dangerous practice. We recommend incorporation of education about cellular phone use and driving in health/safety curriculums for high school and college students.",
author = "Adam Szyfman and Gregory Wanner and Leslie Spencer",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/19325037.2003.10603533",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "81--83",
journal = "American Journal of Health Education",
issn = "1932-5037",
publisher = "AAHPERD",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between cellular phone use, performance, and reaction time among college students

T2 - Implications for cellular phone use while driving

AU - Szyfman, Adam

AU - Wanner, Gregory

AU - Spencer, Leslie

PY - 2003/1/1

Y1 - 2003/1/1

N2 - Two studies were performed to determine the relationship between cellular phone use and either reaction time or performance among college students. In the first study 60 undergraduates completed a computerized reaction time test. Mean reaction times were significantly higher when participants were talking on a cellular phone, either handheld or on a headset, than when they were not. In the second study 40 undergraduates steered a remote-controlled car through an obstacle course. Performance scores were significantly poorer for participants when they were talking on a cellular phone than when they were not. A majority of participants reported using cellular phones while driving, yet believed this was a dangerous practice. We recommend incorporation of education about cellular phone use and driving in health/safety curriculums for high school and college students.

AB - Two studies were performed to determine the relationship between cellular phone use and either reaction time or performance among college students. In the first study 60 undergraduates completed a computerized reaction time test. Mean reaction times were significantly higher when participants were talking on a cellular phone, either handheld or on a headset, than when they were not. In the second study 40 undergraduates steered a remote-controlled car through an obstacle course. Performance scores were significantly poorer for participants when they were talking on a cellular phone than when they were not. A majority of participants reported using cellular phones while driving, yet believed this was a dangerous practice. We recommend incorporation of education about cellular phone use and driving in health/safety curriculums for high school and college students.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=9144260983&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=9144260983&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/19325037.2003.10603533

DO - 10.1080/19325037.2003.10603533

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:9144260983

VL - 34

SP - 81

EP - 83

JO - American Journal of Health Education

JF - American Journal of Health Education

SN - 1932-5037

IS - 2

ER -