The real you? the role of visual cues and comment congruence in perceptions of social attractiveness from facebook profiles

Seoyeon Hong, Edson Tandoc, Eunjin Anna Kim, Bokyung Kim, Kevin Wise

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of social cues in self-presentations and the congruence of other-generated comments with the self-presentation in people's evaluations of a profile owner. A 2 (level of social cues: high vs. low)×2 (congruent vs. incongruent)×2 (order)×2 (multiple messages) mixed-subject experiment was conducted with 104 college students. The results showed that a profile owner was perceived less socially attractive when other-generated comments were incongruent with the profile owner's self-presentation. No matter how people package themselves with extravagant self-presentations, it cannot be very successful without validation from others. Interestingly, an interaction effect between congruence and the level of social cues suggested that perceived popularity was low in the incongruent condition regardless of level of social cue. Theoretical and practical implications were also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-344
Number of pages6
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Social Perception
self-presentation
facebook
social attraction
Cues
Students
Experiments
popularity
experiment
interaction
evaluation
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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The real you? the role of visual cues and comment congruence in perceptions of social attractiveness from facebook profiles. / Hong, Seoyeon; Tandoc, Edson; Kim, Eunjin Anna; Kim, Bokyung; Wise, Kevin.

In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Vol. 15, No. 7, 01.07.2012, p. 339-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Wise, Kevin

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