The many facets of mindfulness and the prediction of change following mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR)

Michael J. Gawrysiak, Stevie N. Grassetti, Jeffrey M. Greeson, Ryan C. Shorey, Ryan Pohlig, Michael J. Baime

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) promotes numerous psychological benefits, but few studies have identified for whom MBSR is most effective. The current study tested the hypothesis that lower baseline mindfulness invites more “room to grow” and, thus, predicts greater improvement during MBSR. Method: We examined three facets of mindfulness (awareness, acceptance, decentering) among 131 MBSR participants prior to enrollment, to test the hypothesis that lower baseline mindfulness predicts greater improvements in perceived stress, positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA) following MBSR. Results: Lower acceptance and decentering predicted greater decreases in perceived stress. Higher awareness, acceptance, and decentering predicted greater increases in PA. Higher awareness predicted greater reductions in NA. Lower decentering predicted greater reductions in NA. Conclusion: Findings partly supported the hypothesis that lower baseline mindfulness predicts greater improvement following MBSR and emphasize the importance of assessing multiple mindfulness facets given their unique, contrasting relations to outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-535
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology

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