The influence of biological sex and cuff width on muscle swelling, echo intensity, and the fatigue response to blood flow restricted exercise

Vickie Wong, Takashi Abe, Raksha N Chatakondi, Zachary W Bell, Robert W Spitz, Scott J Dankel, Jeremy P Loenneke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose was to determine if the muscle swelling, echo intensity, and fatigue responses to blood flow restriction differs based on cuff width (Experiment 1), applied pressure (Experiment 2), and sex. Ultrasound of muscle was taken before and after exercise. In Experiment 1 (n = 96), men swelled more than women and more with a narrow cuff than a wide cuff (0.60 cm vs. 0.52 cm). Expressed as a percentage change, there were no longer differences between cuffs (Narrow: 15% vs. Wide: 14%) or sex (Men: 14% vs. Women: 15%). Echo intensity remained unchanged. Women required more repetitions to reach task failure in sets 2, 3, and 4. In Experiment 2 (n = 87), men swelled more than women (Men: 0.46 cm vs. Women: 0.31 cm). Expressed as a percentage change, there were no differences. Echo intensity decreased in both conditions and to a greater extent with a higher applied pressure. If the acute muscle swelling response is important for initiating long term adaptation, then our results indicate that neither cuff width, sex, nor applied pressure will differentially impact the adaptation observed via this mechanism. Changes in echo intensity were inconsistent and the utility of this measurement may need to be reconsidered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1865-1873
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume37
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

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