The cell wall sensors Mtl1, Wsc1, and Mid2 are required for stress-induced nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of cyclin C and programmed cell death in yeast

Chunyan Jin, Andrey V. Parshin, Ira Daly, Randy Strich, Katrina F. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mtl1 is a member of a cell wall sensor family that monitors cell wall integrity in budding yeast. In response to cell wall stress, Mtl1 activates the cell wall integrity (CWI) MAP kinase pathway which transmits this signal to the nucleus to effect changes in gene expression. One target of the CWI MAP kinase is cyclin C, a negative regulator of stress response genes. CWI activation results in cyclin C relocalization from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it stimulates programmed cell death (PCD) before it is destroyed. This report demonstrates that under low oxidative stress conditions, a combination of membrane sensors, Mtl1 and either Wsc1 or Mid2, are required jointly to transmit the oxidative stress signal to initiate cyclin C destruction. However, when exposed to elevated oxidative stress, additional pathways independent of these three sensor proteins are activated to destroy cyclin C. In addition, N-glycosylation is important for Mtl1 function as mutating the receptor residue (Asn42) or an enzyme required for synthesis of N-acetylglucosamine (Gfa1) reduces sensor activity. Finally, combining gfa1-1 with the cyclin C null allele induces a severe synthetic growth defect. This surprising result reveals a previously unknown genetic interaction between cyclin C and plasma membrane integrity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number320823
JournalOxidative medicine and cellular longevity
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

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