Templated hydrogels for combination devices: Therapeutic contact lenses

Maryam Ali, Asa D. Vaughan, Jeney Zhang, Sid Venkatesh, Mark E. Byrne

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    1 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Molecular imprinting provides a rational design strategy for the development of controlled release drug delivery systems. We demonstrate that imprinting a network results in macromolecular memory for the template molecule, indicated by the two or more times greater partitioning into these networks as compared to non-imprinted networks. Partitioning of drug into networks synthesized from multiple functional monomers was 8 times greater than networks synthesized from single monomers. One-dimensional permeation studies showed that the gel with maximum incorporated chemical functionality had the lowest diffusion coefficient, which was at least an order of magnitude lower than all other gels studied. All imprinted networks had significantly lower diffusion coefficients than non-imprinted networks, in spite of comparable mesh sizes and equilibrium polymer volume fractions in the swollen state. This work also demonstrates molecular imprinting using a "living/controlled" polymerization strategy to enhance template loading/affinity and delay release in weakly crosslinked gels. Recognition studies revealed more than a 50% increase in template loading and dynamic template release studies showed that imprinting via "living" polymerization extends or delays the template release profile by two-fold over that of imprinting via conventional free-radical polymerization techniques and four-fold over the control network. The imprinted gel and imprinted gel prepared via "living/controlled" polymerization release profiles were less Fickian and moved toward zero-order release with profile coefficients of 0.68 and 0.70, respectively.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
    Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    Pages242-245
    Number of pages4
    ISBN (Print)9781424432967
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
    Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
    Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

    Publication series

    NameProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009

    Other

    Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
    CountryUnited States
    CityMinneapolis, MN
    Period9/2/099/6/09

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Cell Biology
    • Developmental Biology
    • Biomedical Engineering
    • Medicine(all)

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