Technology-based music classes in high schools in the United States

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which comprehensive public high schools in the United States offer music classes that are technology-based, and to describe the nature of these classes. In the first phase of the study, principals from 10% of comprehensive public high schools in the United States (n = 1830) were surveyed regarding the technology-based music offerings of their high schools. Of the respondents (n = 528), 14% indicated that their schools offered technology-based music classes. Responses varied between geographic region and community type, with suburban high schools in the Northeast being most likely to offer these classes. Sixty-six percent of principals viewed technology-based music classes as a positive offering, and 56% of respondents from schools without these classes felt it would be possible to offer such a course. Music technology teachers (n = 58), identified by their principals, were sent a follow-up survey. Their responses (n = 29) indicated that these classes were generally designed for, and taken by, nontraditional music students, and that these classes had a broad range of curricular materials and objectives. Sixty-seven percent of these classes were initiated in the past ten years, and many were created by individual music teachers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-90
Number of pages18
JournalBulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education
Issue number194
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Music

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