Sleep as a Bio-behavioral Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease

Martica H. Hall, Jeffrey M. Greeson, Elizabeth J. Pantesco

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Until recently, cardiovascular behavioral medicine research, including its conceptual models, measures, and clinical applications, had focused almost exclusively on psychological, social, behavioral, and environmental factors that occur or are measured during waking. Yet, humans spend 1/3 to 1/4 of their lives asleep, and there is strong evidence that sleep is essential to cardiovascular health and functioning. The premise of this chapter is that behavioral medicine models that incorporate sleep, whether as a major variable of interest, a confounder, an effect modifier, or therapeutic target, offer a more complete understanding of the processes through which psychological, social, behavioral, and environmental factors affect and are affected by cardiovascular health and functioning. The goal of this chapter is to identify dimensions of sleep that may be most relevant to cardiovascular behavioral medicine, describe how each dimension may be assessed, and briefly summarize relevant evidence linking sleep to cardiovascular health and functioning. The chapter concludes by identifying important future directions related to the role of sleep in cardiovascular behavioral medicine research. In the concluding section, we highlight mindfulness training as a promising clinical intervention that may target shared bio-behavioral processes implicated in both stress-related sleep disturbance and cardiovascular disease (CVD) pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages411-440
Number of pages30
ISBN (Electronic)9780387859606
ISBN (Print)9780387859590
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Psychology
  • General Medicine

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