Should I say thank you? Gratitude encourages cognitive reappraisal and buffers the negative impact of ambivalence over emotional expression on depression

Jennifer L. Bryan, Chelsie M. Young, Sydnee Lucas, Michelle C. Quist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study assessed relationships among gratitude, ambivalence over emotional expression (AEE), cognitive reappraisal, and depressive symptoms. Three-hundred and fifty-two undergraduates (M age = 23.51 years, SD = 6.80) completed study materials. Findings revealed that higher levels of gratitude mitigated the positive relationship between AEE and depression. Those who were high in AEE and gratitude reported higher levels of cognitive reappraisal. Moreover, moderated mediation models showed that cognitive reappraisal mediated the relationship between AEE and depressive symptoms for those who reported high levels of gratitude. These results indicate that gratitude may be particularly useful for ameliorating depressive symptoms for those who are high in AEE through the use of cognitive reappraisal. These results can inform future interventions for those high in AEE and experiencing depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-258
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume120
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Psychology

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