Schizotypy as a predictor for problematic technology use in emerging adults

Devin Massaro, George Nitzburg, Tom Dinzeo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the unique domains/symptom clusters within schizotypy as they relate to problematic technology use, while controlling for co-morbid disorders such as depression and anxiety. Using an online survey, this study measured electronic media use, problematic technology use, and schizotypy in 270 undergraduate students (aged 18-30). We expected mood symptoms of anxiety and depression to predict problematic technology use in this sample, and controlled for these variables in our model comparison. It was hypothesized that schizotypy would contribute significantly to the prediction of problematic technology use above and beyond anxiety, depression, and demographic variables. Based on the available literature with adult samples, it was hypothesized that the strongest predictor of problematic technology use would be positive schizotypy. After a model comparison utilizing hierarchical linear regression, schizotypy total scores predicted greater problematic technology use in this sample. However, contrary to the hypotheses, disorganized schizotypy was found to be the strongest predictor of problematic technology use. The details of these findings are discussed in addition to a call for more research into electronic media use in this population of emerging adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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