Residential greenspace and urban adolescent substance use: Exploring interactive effects with peer network health, sex, and executive function

Jeremy Mennis, Xiaojiang Li, Mahbubur Meenar, J. Douglas Coatsworth, Thomas P. McKeon, Michael J. Mason

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    While urban greenspace is increasingly recognized as important to mental health, its role in substance use is understudied. This exploratory study investigates the interaction of greenspace with peer network health, sex, and executive function (EF) in models of substance use among a sample of disadvantaged, urban youth. Adolescents and their parents were recruited from a hospital in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. Residential greenspace at the streetscape level was derived from analysis of Google Street View imagery. Logistic regression models were used to test the moderating effect of greenspace on the association between peer network health and substance use, as well as additional moderating effects of sex and EF. The significant negative association of peer network health with substance use occurred only among youth residing in high greenspace envi-ronments, a moderating effect which was stronger among youth with high EF deficit. The moderating effect of greenspace did not differ between girls and boys. Greenspace may play an important role in moderating peer influences on substance use among disadvantaged, urban adolescents, and such moderation may differ according to an individual’s level of EF. This research provides evidence of differences in environmental susceptibility regarding contextual mechanisms of substance use among youth, and it informs the development of targeted substance use interventions that lev-erage social and environmental influences on adolescent substance.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number1611
    Pages (from-to)1-15
    Number of pages15
    JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
    Volume18
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 2 2021

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Pollution
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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