Religious coping and depressive symptoms among black americans living with HIV: An intersectional approach

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Abstract

This exploratory quantitative study examined the association between religious coping and depressive symptoms among a sample of 216 Black Americans living with HIV (BALWHs) in the southeastern United States. Descriptive analyses and multiple linear regression were used to determine statistically significant associations between religious coping styles and depressive symptoms and to investigate the potential of sexual orientation and gender to moderate the associations between religious coping styles and depressive symptoms. Negative religious coping, but not positive religious coping, significantly predicted depressive symptoms. Sexual orientation, but not gender, significantly moderated the association between positive religious coping and depressive symptoms so that the relationship was significant for only heterosexual BALWHs. Implications of these findings for future research and clinical work with BALWHs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-268
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology of Religion and Spirituality
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Religious studies
  • Applied Psychology

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