Prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections: Is it time to add simulation training to the prevention bundle?

Amanda R. Burden, Marc C. Torjman, George E. Dy, Jonathan D. Jaffe, Jeffrey J. Littman, Fiorella Nawar, S. Sujanthy Rajaram, Christa Schorr, Gregory W. Staman, Annette C. Reboli

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    Abstract

    Study Objective: To study the impact of adding simulation-based education to the pre-intervention mandatory hospital efforts aimed at decreasing central venous catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) in intensive care units (ICU). Design: Pre- and post-intervention retrospective observational investigation. Setting: 24-bed ICU and a 562-bed university-affiliated, urban teaching hospital. Patients: ICU patients July 2004-June 2008 were studied for the development of central venous catheter related blood stream infections (CRBSI). Measurements: ICU patients from July 2004-June 2008 were studied for the development of central venous catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI). Pre-Intervention: mandatory staff and physician education began in 2004 to reduce CRBSI. The CRBSI-prevention program included online and didactic courses, and a pre- and post-test. Elements in the pre-intervention efforts included hand hygiene, full barrier precautions, use of Chlorhexidine skin preparation, and mask, gown, gloves, and hat protection for operators. A catheter-insertion cart containing all supplies and checklist were was a mandatory element of this program; a nurse was empowered to stop the procedure for non-performance of checklist items. Intervention: As of July 1, 2006, a mandatory simulation-based program for all intern, resident, and fellow physicians was added to teach central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. Measurements: Data collected pre- and post-intervention were CRBSI incidence, number of ICU catheter days, mortality, laboratory pathogen results, and costs. Main Results: The pre-intervention CRBSI incidence of 6.47/1,000 catheter days was reduced significantly to 2.44/1,000 catheter days post-intervention (58%; P < 0.05), resulting in a $539,902 savings (USD; 47%), and was attributed to shorter ICU and hospital lengths of stay. Conclusions: Following simulation-based CVC program implementation, CRBSI incidence and costs were significantly reduced for two years post-intervention.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)555-560
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
    Volume24
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

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    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

    Cite this

    Burden, A. R., Torjman, M. C., Dy, G. E., Jaffe, J. D., Littman, J. J., Nawar, F., Rajaram, S. S., Schorr, C., Staman, G. W., & Reboli, A. C. (2012). Prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections: Is it time to add simulation training to the prevention bundle? Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, 24(7), 555-560. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2012.04.006