Present but Not Prevalent: Identifying the Organizational Correlates of Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships in U.S. Law Enforcement

Jeff Rojek, John A. Shjarback, John Andrew Hansen, Geoffrey P. Alpert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Translational policing science must begin with explicitly communicated research aims and a shared vision for promoting safety. For researchers to approach police departments without first considering the concerns held by officers and their departments at large, is unethical, unproductive, and undermines efforts to secure longstanding mutually useful researcher-practitioner partnerships. In presenting a case study analysis of the multi-method National Justice Database’s recruitment practices, this chapter highlights some of the challenges that emerge when articulating study aims that hold relevance for public safety; defining theoretically- and solution-oriented research questions; administrative police data collection, analysis, and dissemination; and bolstering human research subject protection protocols for sworn officers who may be justifiably reluctant to participate in social science research endeavors. Implications for ethical policing research practice, fostering collaborative researcher-practitioner partnerships, and leveraging the benefits of data science are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTranslational Criminology in Policing
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages89-104
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781000578461
ISBN (Print)9780367716325
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

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