Potential utility of autoantibodies as blood-based biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

The Parkinson's Study Group Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: There is a great need to identify readily accessible, blood-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD) that are useful for accurate early detection and diagnosis. This advancement would allow early patient treatment and enrollment into clinical trials, both of which would greatly facilitate the development of new therapies for PD. Methods: Sera from a total of 398 subjects, including 103 early-stage PD subjects derived from the Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) study, were screened with human protein microarrays containing 9,486 potential antigen targets to identify autoantibodies potentially useful as biomarkers for PD. A panel of selected autoantibodies with a higher prevalence in early-stage PD was identified and tested using Random Forest for its ability to distinguish early-stage PD subjects from controls and from individuals with other neurodegenerative and non-neurodegenerative diseases. Results: Results demonstrate that a panel of selected, blood-borne autoantibody biomarkers can distinguish early-stage PD subjects (90% confidence in diagnosis) from age- and sex-matched controls with an overall accuracy of 87.9%, a sensitivity of 94.1% and specificity of 85.5%. These biomarkers were also capable of differentiating patients with early-stage PD from those with more advanced (mild-moderate) PD with an overall accuracy of 97.5%, and could distinguish subjects with early-stage PD from those with other neurological (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis) and non-neurological (e.g., breast cancer) diseases. Conclusion: These results demonstrate, for the first time, that a panel of selected autoantibodies may prove to be useful as effective blood-based biomarkers for the diagnosis of early-stage PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-88
Number of pages9
JournalImmunology Letters
Volume168
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Autoantibodies
Parkinson Disease
Early Diagnosis
Biomarkers
Alzheimer Disease
Selegiline
Protein Array Analysis
Breast Diseases
Aptitude
Tocopherols
Parkinsonian Disorders
Multiple Sclerosis
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials
Breast Neoplasms
Antigens
Sensitivity and Specificity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Potential utility of autoantibodies as blood-based biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease",
abstract = "Introduction: There is a great need to identify readily accessible, blood-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD) that are useful for accurate early detection and diagnosis. This advancement would allow early patient treatment and enrollment into clinical trials, both of which would greatly facilitate the development of new therapies for PD. Methods: Sera from a total of 398 subjects, including 103 early-stage PD subjects derived from the Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) study, were screened with human protein microarrays containing 9,486 potential antigen targets to identify autoantibodies potentially useful as biomarkers for PD. A panel of selected autoantibodies with a higher prevalence in early-stage PD was identified and tested using Random Forest for its ability to distinguish early-stage PD subjects from controls and from individuals with other neurodegenerative and non-neurodegenerative diseases. Results: Results demonstrate that a panel of selected, blood-borne autoantibody biomarkers can distinguish early-stage PD subjects (90{\%} confidence in diagnosis) from age- and sex-matched controls with an overall accuracy of 87.9{\%}, a sensitivity of 94.1{\%} and specificity of 85.5{\%}. These biomarkers were also capable of differentiating patients with early-stage PD from those with more advanced (mild-moderate) PD with an overall accuracy of 97.5{\%}, and could distinguish subjects with early-stage PD from those with other neurological (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis) and non-neurological (e.g., breast cancer) diseases. Conclusion: These results demonstrate, for the first time, that a panel of selected autoantibodies may prove to be useful as effective blood-based biomarkers for the diagnosis of early-stage PD.",
author = "{The Parkinson's Study Group Investigators} and DeMarshall, {Cassandra A.} and Min Han and Nagele, {Eric P.} and Abhirup Sarkar and Acharya, {Nimish K.} and George Godsey and Goldwaser, {Eric L.} and Mary Kosciuk and Umashanger Thayasivam and Benjamin Belinka and Nagele, {Robert G.}",
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Potential utility of autoantibodies as blood-based biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. / The Parkinson's Study Group Investigators.

In: Immunology Letters, Vol. 168, No. 1, 01.11.2015, p. 80-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Potential utility of autoantibodies as blood-based biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

AU - The Parkinson's Study Group Investigators

AU - DeMarshall, Cassandra A.

AU - Han, Min

AU - Nagele, Eric P.

AU - Sarkar, Abhirup

AU - Acharya, Nimish K.

AU - Godsey, George

AU - Goldwaser, Eric L.

AU - Kosciuk, Mary

AU - Thayasivam, Umashanger

AU - Belinka, Benjamin

AU - Nagele, Robert G.

PY - 2015/11/1

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N2 - Introduction: There is a great need to identify readily accessible, blood-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD) that are useful for accurate early detection and diagnosis. This advancement would allow early patient treatment and enrollment into clinical trials, both of which would greatly facilitate the development of new therapies for PD. Methods: Sera from a total of 398 subjects, including 103 early-stage PD subjects derived from the Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) study, were screened with human protein microarrays containing 9,486 potential antigen targets to identify autoantibodies potentially useful as biomarkers for PD. A panel of selected autoantibodies with a higher prevalence in early-stage PD was identified and tested using Random Forest for its ability to distinguish early-stage PD subjects from controls and from individuals with other neurodegenerative and non-neurodegenerative diseases. Results: Results demonstrate that a panel of selected, blood-borne autoantibody biomarkers can distinguish early-stage PD subjects (90% confidence in diagnosis) from age- and sex-matched controls with an overall accuracy of 87.9%, a sensitivity of 94.1% and specificity of 85.5%. These biomarkers were also capable of differentiating patients with early-stage PD from those with more advanced (mild-moderate) PD with an overall accuracy of 97.5%, and could distinguish subjects with early-stage PD from those with other neurological (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis) and non-neurological (e.g., breast cancer) diseases. Conclusion: These results demonstrate, for the first time, that a panel of selected autoantibodies may prove to be useful as effective blood-based biomarkers for the diagnosis of early-stage PD.

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