Patient awareness of reported adverse effects associated with proton pump inhibitors in a medically underserved community

Brian White, Matthew Drew, John Gaughan, Sangita Phadtare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Reports of adverse effects associated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are concerning because of high usage and over-the-counter availability. We sought to determine the awareness of PPI adverse effects among our patient population, which is medically underserved, low-income, and racially diverse. A 21-item survey was administered to gastroenterology-clinic outpatients. It collected information about age, gender, education, race, specialty of the prescriber, specific PPI, indication, knowledge of dose, adherence, duration of use and awareness of any risks. Medical records were reviewed to verify survey responses pertaining to indication, dosing, and adherence. A vast majority (96%) of 101 participants were not aware of PPI adverse effects. In total, 63% of the patients completed a high school education or less, which was associated with a higher risk of long-term PPI use than completion of at least an undergraduate degree (p = 0.05). In contrast to other studies, the shockingly low patient awareness about PPI adverse effects in our patient population is particularly concerning, especially as it is tied to their demographic attributes. This may lead to long-term and high-dose PPI use. Our study highlights the need for effective provider-driven education regarding medication risks, especially in the communities with significant health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number499
JournalHealthcare (Switzerland)
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Policy
  • Health Information Management
  • Leadership and Management

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