NPC1 deficiency impairs cerebellar postnatal development of microglia and climbing fiber refinement in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick disease type C

Bridget R. Boyle, Sierra E. Melli, Ruth S. Altreche, Zachary M. Padron, Fawad A.K. Yousufzai, Sarah Kim, Mariella D. Vasquez, Dawn M. Carone, Benjamin R. Carone, Ileana Soto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Little is known about the effects of NPC1 deficiency in brain development and whether these effects contribute to neurodegeneration in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells occurs at an earlier stage and to a greater extent in NPC; therefore, we analyzed the effect of NPC1 deficiency on microglia and on climbing fiber synaptic refinement during cerebellar postnatal development using the Npc1nmf164 mouse. Our analysis revealed that NPC1 deficiency leads to early phenotypic changes in microglia that are not associated with an innate immune response. However, the lack of NPC1 in Npc1nmf164 mice significantly affected the early development of microglia by delaying the radial migration, increasing the proliferation and impairing the differentiation of microglia precursor cells during postnatal development. Additionally, increased phagocytic activity of differentiating microglia was observed at the end of the second postnatal week in Npc1nmf164 mice. Moreover, significant climbing fiber synaptic refinement deficits along with an increased engulfment of climbing fiber synaptic elements by microglia were found in Npc1nmf164 mice, suggesting that profound developmental defects in microglia and synaptic connectivity might precede and predispose Purkinje cells to early neurodegeneration in NPC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopment (Cambridge)
Volume147
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology

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