Neuropsychological Decline in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: A Longitudinal Analysis

David J. Libon, Sharon X. Xie, Xingmei Wang, Lauren Massimo, Peachie Moore, Luisa Vesely, Alea Khan, Anjan Chatterjee, H. Branch Coslett, Howard I. Hurtig, Tsao Wei Liang, Murray Grossman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few studies have assessed whether the patterns of neuropsychological impairment in patients with different frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) subtypes remain distinct over the duration of their illness or devolve into a common, undifferentiated neuropsychological state. A longitudinal neuropsychological analysis was obtained over 100 months assessing executive control, language/naming, and visuoconstruction in 441 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and four FTLD subtypes, i.e., a social comportment/dysexecutive (SOC/EXEC) disorder; progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA); semantic dementia (SemD); and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Initial group differences on each measure were maintained over the duration of illness, including several double dissociations. For example, AD patients exhibited a decline in 'animal' fluency; PNFA patients had difficulty on tests of executive control, SemD maintained their impairment on tests of naming, and CBD had presented with performance on visuoconstructional tests. None of the group by neuropsychological task interactions evaluating longitudinal decline was significant, suggesting that performance does not converge onto a common subtype over time. These data indicate that distinct patterns of neuropsychological impairment are maintained longitudinally, reflecting the unique anatomic distribution of relative disease burden in AD and FTLD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-346
Number of pages10
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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