Muscle growth adaptations to high-load training and low-load training with blood flow restriction in calf muscles

Ryo Kataoka, Ecaterina Vasenina, William B. Hammert, Adam H. Ibrahim, Scott J. Dankel, Samuel L. Buckner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To compare muscle growth adaptations between traditional high-load training and low-load training with blood flow restriction (BFR) in the calf muscles over 6 weeks. Methods: 27 trained individuals performed calf exercise in both legs for 6 weeks. Each leg was randomly assigned to one of the two conditions: (1) Traditional (70% of 1RM) training (TRAD); and (2) Low-load (30% of 1RM) training with BFR. In addition, subjects performed standing calf raises with or without BFR. Measures were taken pre- and post-intervention. Results: For the posterior muscle site, there was no condition (BFR vs. TRAD) × time (pre vs. post) interaction (p = 0.15). In addition, there was no main effect for condition (p = 0.83) or time (p = 0.20). For the lateral muscle site, there was no condition × time interaction (p = 0.47). In addition, there was no main effect for condition (p = 0.10) or time (p = 0.57). For the medial muscle site, there was no condition × time interaction (p = 0.60). In addition, there was no main effect for condition (p = 0.44) or time (p = 0.72). For RPE, there was no condition × time interaction. However, there was a main effect for condition (p < 0.05) with BFR having higher RPE. For discomfort, there was no condition × time interaction. However, there was a main effect for condition (p < 0.001) with the BFR condition displaying higher discomfort. Conclusion: No muscle growth was detected in the calf musculature. BFR was not more effective at eliciting muscle hypertrophy compared to traditional training. However, it was accompanied with higher exertion and discomfort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-634
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume122
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

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