Mindfulness predicts less texting while driving among young adults: Examining attention- and emotion-regulation motives as potential mediators

Greg Feldman, Jeff Greeson, Megan Renna, Kendra Robbins-Monteith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many young adult drivers read and send text messages while driving despite clear safety risks. Understanding predictors of texting-while-driving may help to indentify relevant targets for interventions to reduce this dangerous behavior. The present study examined whether individual differences in mindfulness are associated with texting-while-driving in a sample of young-adult drivers. Using path analysis, we tested whether this relationship would be mediated by the degree to which individuals use text-messaging as a means of reducing unpleasant emotions (emotion-regulation motives) and the degree to which individuals limit texting in order to focus on present-moment experiences (attention-regulation motives). Individuals lower in mindfulness reported more frequent texting-while-driving and this relationship appeared to be mediated primarily by emotion-regulation motives. Results may help inform the development of mindfulness-based interventions to prevent texting-while-driving.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)856-861
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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