How does manipulation of secondary task scheduling affect human performance?

Patrice D. Tremoulet, Kathleen M. Stibler, Patrick Craven, Joyce Barton, Adam Gifford, Susan Harkness Regli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Systems that can track and intelligently adapt to changes in users' cognitive capacities may help to improve human performance. The experiment reported here was designed to assess the benefit of placing neuro-physiological sensors on users to provide data about their cognitive states that can drive performance mitigations. A test group of 16 participants performed a primary task while monitoring for alerts (secondary task) under four conditions: no-mitigation (alerts presented as they arrive), random mitigation (system randomly alters the presentation times of alerts), sensor-driven mitigation (system uses sensor data to influence alert presentation times), and user-driven mitigation (participants pressed a button to influence the alert presentation times). Participants completed no-mitigation and user-driven mitigation conditions faster than sensor-driven and random mitigation conditions, but their accuracy scores did not differ significantly across the four conditions. This is likely due to a ceiling effect: participants' accuracy scores exceeded 90% in every condition. Future work should investigate the possibility that user-driven mitigation may, in some cases, improve performance better than sensor-driven mitigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1945-1948
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9780945289296
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2006Oct 20 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period10/16/0610/20/06

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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    Tremoulet, P. D., Stibler, K. M., Craven, P., Barton, J., Gifford, A., & Regli, S. H. (2006). How does manipulation of secondary task scheduling affect human performance? In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006 (pp. 1945-1948). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/154193120605001749