Green power engineering: Pedagogy for the next generation of electrical engineers

Peter Mark Jansson, Shreekanth Mandayam, John Schmalzel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The modern power system faces the greatest challenges it has seen in its brief history: new technologies (generation, IT, etc.), market economics and competition, corporate environmental responsibility, and society's growing reliability expectations. Where will the expertise for the new generation multidisciplinary power engineer who must design, operate, and manage it come from? The training must begin at the undergraduate engineering level where the myriad of scientific and economic bases for the modern electric power system can be taught holistically. Increased demand for expertise in power engineering, and particularly green power engineering, comes at a time when many undergraduate EE/ECE curricula are already strained to address the many emergent topics created by technologic change in this rapidly evolving discipline. Fortunately, one university's experience using an agile learning environment demonstrates that key pedagogical competencies and experiences in green power engineering can be accomplished within an existing ECE program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting
Pages65-70
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Event2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Jun 6 2004Jun 10 2004

Publication series

Name2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting
Volume1

Other

Other2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period6/6/046/10/04

Fingerprint

Engineers
Economics
Electric power systems
Curricula
Power generation
History

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Jansson, P. M., Mandayam, S., & Schmalzel, J. (2004). Green power engineering: Pedagogy for the next generation of electrical engineers. In 2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting (pp. 65-70). (2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting; Vol. 1).
Jansson, Peter Mark ; Mandayam, Shreekanth ; Schmalzel, John. / Green power engineering : Pedagogy for the next generation of electrical engineers. 2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting. 2004. pp. 65-70 (2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting).
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Jansson, PM, Mandayam, S & Schmalzel, J 2004, Green power engineering: Pedagogy for the next generation of electrical engineers. in 2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting. 2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting, vol. 1, pp. 65-70, 2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting, Denver, CO, United States, 6/6/04.

Green power engineering : Pedagogy for the next generation of electrical engineers. / Jansson, Peter Mark; Mandayam, Shreekanth; Schmalzel, John.

2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting. 2004. p. 65-70 (2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting; Vol. 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Jansson PM, Mandayam S, Schmalzel J. Green power engineering: Pedagogy for the next generation of electrical engineers. In 2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting. 2004. p. 65-70. (2004 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting).