Does the fat-but-fit paradigm hold true for all-cause mortality when considering the duration of overweight/obesity? Analyzing the WATCH (Weight, Activity and Time Contributes to Health) paradigm

Scott J Dankel, Jeremy P Loenneke, Paul D Loprinzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physical activity has been shown to attenuate the association between overweight/obesity and mortality. Much less is known, however, on how the duration of overweight/obesity potentially alters this association, which was the purpose of this study.

METHODS: The 1999-2006 NHANES was used and 11,057 adults (ages 36-85) were evaluated. Eight mutually exclusive groups were created: (1) physically active, normal weight now and 10years ago; (2) physically inactive, normal weight now and 10years ago; (3) physically active, overweight/obese now but normal weight 10years ago; (4) physically inactive, normal weight now but overweight/obese 10years ago; (5) physically active, overweight/obese now but normal weight 10years ago; (6) physically inactive, overweight/obese now but normal weight 10years ago; (7) physically active, overweight/obese now and 10years ago; and (8) physically inactive, overweight/obese now and 10years ago.

RESULTS: After adjustments, only those individuals that were inactive were at a significantly increased risk for all-cause mortality independent of overweight/obesity status (Groups 2, 4, 6, 8).

CONCLUSION: In alignment with the Exercise is Medicine initiative®, our results provide support for clinicians to perform routine assessments of physical activity, and to further promote physical activity among all individuals regardless of body mass status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-40
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume83
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2016

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