Differential longitudinal decline on the mini-mental state examination in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and alzheimer disease

Kay See Tan, David J. Libon, Katya Rascovsky, Murray Grossman, Sharon X. Xie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To examine how phenotype affects longitudinal decline on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer disease (AD). BACKGROUND:: The MMSE is the most commonly administered assessment for dementia severity; however, the effects of phenotype on longitudinal MMSE performance in FTLD and AD have not been extensively studied. METHODS:: Data from 185 patients diagnosed with AD (n=106) and 3 FTLD (n=79) phenotypes [behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), nonfluent agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfaPPA), and semantic variant PPA (svPPA)] were collected for up to 52 months since initial evaluation. RESULTS:: Differential rates of decline were noted in that MMSE scores declined more precipitously for AD and svPPA compared with bvFTD and nfaPPA patients (P=0.001). The absolute 4-year MMSE decline given median baseline MMSE for bvFTD [14.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 14.63-14.71] and nfaPPA (11.02; 95% CI, 10.98-11.06) were lower than svPPA (22.32; 95% CI, 22.29-22.34) or AD (22.24; 95% CI, 22.22-22.26). CONCLUSIONS:: These data suggest that within-group AD and FTLD phenotypes present distinct patterns of longitudinal decline on the MMSE. MMSE may not be adequately sensitive to track disease progression in some phenotypes of FTLD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-315
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Differential longitudinal decline on the mini-mental state examination in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and alzheimer disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this