Development and initial demonstration of a community-based intervention for homeless, cocaine-using, African-American Women

Gerald J. Stahler, Thomas E. Shipley, Kimberly C. Kirby, Catherine Godboldte, Mary Louise E. Kerwin, Irving Shandler, Lori Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drug abstinence is difficult to achieve and maintain, especially when clients return to their pretreatment environment. Forging ties with the natural helping networks in the community, such as religious organizations, may reinforce abstinent behaviors established during treatment. This study evaluated Bridges to the Community, a supplemental component to an intensive residential treatment program. Bridges uses members of African-American churches as mentors for recovering women. This demonstration project included 118 female participants with primary cocaine dependence who received either standard treatment or Bridges plus standard treatment. Participants in both groups reduced substance use, risk-taking behaviors, depression, and increased self-esteem. Participants who received Bridges had greater treatment retention, reported 100% cocaine abstinence at follow-up, and were more satisfied with their treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-179
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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