Degrees of Urbanism and Police Orientations: Testing Preferences for Different Policing Approaches Across Urban, Suburban, and Rural Areas

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Abstract

Citizen preferences for different police orientations have seldom been studied as a variable that is affected by degrees of urbanism. Although actual police styles are perceived to reflect preferences of local residents, there is no empirical evidence that suggests this is true. The data for this study was collected by surveying residents living in areas with various levels of urbanism to understand whether degrees of urbanism explain differences in preferences for different policing approaches across urban, suburban, and rural areas. The results indicated that urban residents have a stronger preference for community policing, suburban residents have a greater preference for police professionalism, and rural residents have a stronger interest in problem-oriented policing. The findings are explained with various personal, social, and contextual predictors, and their implications for policing are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-387
Number of pages27
JournalPolice Quarterly
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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