Deaf access to justice in Northern Ireland: rethinking ‘Reasonable Adjustment’ in the Disability Discrimination Act

Michael A. Schwartz, Brent C. Elder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article provides findings of a qualitative study exploring the interactions of eight Deaf participants and one hearing ally with the justice system in Northern Ireland, where the Disability Discrimination Act requires solicitors to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ in order to provide effective access to Deaf clients. Three thematic categories emerged: (a) barriers to accessing justice, (b) work Deaf people do for access, and (c) the need to educate solicitors about access. A central strain ran through these themes: the idea that ‘reasonable adjustment’ must reflect the value of sign language interpreters in facilitating effective communication access for all the parties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1003-1024
Number of pages22
JournalDisability and Society
Volume33
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 9 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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