Controlled drug release from weakly crosslinked molecularly imprinted networks: The benefit of living radical polymerization

Vishal D. Salian, Mark E. Byrne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This work focuses on the complex relationship between molecularly imprinted polymer network formation, network structure, and composition, and template binding and transport. A comprehensive study of template binding and transport is performed using two different reaction schemes (living radical polymerization and conventional free radical polymerization) while altering template concentration, functional monomer concentration, solvent content, crosslinking monomer length, and extent of crosslinking. Imprinted poly(HEMA-co-DEAEM-co- PEG200DMA) networks prepared by living radical polymerization (LRP) exhibit enhanced molecular imprinting and have significantly higher template binding affinities (≈2×), higher binding capacities (≈2.3×), slower template release, and lower template diffusion coefficients (1/2×) compared with imprinted polymers prepared via free radical polymerization (FRP) with statistically similar parameters for non-imprinted polymers. A synergistic effect between LRP and molecular imprinting is demonstrated. LRP has a profound structural effect on the network leading to reduced free volume and/or increased homogeneity in the mesh structure leading to enhanced macromolecular memory. In addition, by altering reaction parameters, like template and monomer concentrations, the template binding and release characteristics can be tuned. By using an LRP reaction scheme, improved control over release can be achieved enhancing the role the molecular imprinting technique can make in the design and engineering of novel drug delivery materials. A synergistic effect between living radical polymerization (LRP) and molecular imprinting is demonstrated. As a result, imprinted poly(HEMA-co-DEAEM-co-PEG200DMA) networks prepared by LRP exhibit enhanced molecular memory and have significantly higher template binding affinities (≈2×), higher binding capacities (≈2.3×), slower template release, and lower template diffusion coefficients (1/2×) compared with imprinted polymers prepared via free radical polymerization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2355-2366
Number of pages12
JournalMacromolecular Chemistry and Physics
Volume214
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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