CONTINGENT APPOINTMENTS AND THE DIMINISHING VOICE, AGENCY, AND PROFESSIONALISM OF WOMEN

Cecile H. Sam, Adrianna Kezar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Seventy percent of U.S. faculty are off the tenure track (Knapp, Kelly-Reid, and Ginder 2011); yet, academia has largely overlooked the effects of contingent work on women’s careers. For years many non-tenure-track faculty (NTTF)-part-time and full-time faculty who are not eligible for tenure-have worked in higher education under suboptimal conditions: significantly less pay, less respect, less job security, and fewer resources (Baldwin and Chronister 2001; Gappa and Leslie 1993; Gappa, Austin, and Trice 2007; Monks 2007). 1 These inequalities create a dynamic in higher education where three distinct classes of faculty exist: tenured and tenure-track faculty, who have relative prestige full-time NTTF, who have more limited voice; and part-time faculty, who have neither prestige nor a strong voice. Tenure-line faculty tend to be considered professionals whereas non-tenure-line faculty are considered laborers, though they increasingly have similarities in education, academic socialization, and types of work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDisrupting the Culture of Silence
Subtitle of host publicationConfronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages67-82
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781000971637
ISBN (Print)9781620362174
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2023
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Social Sciences

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