Catalysts and motivations for change in privacy coordination: transracial, internationally adoptive parents’ coordination of private, adoption-related information

Mary Claire Morr Loftus, Elizabeth A. Suter, Daniel S. Strasser, Michele D. Hanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Communication Privacy Management theory (CPM) was applied in a qualitative analysis of survey responses from parents in transracial, internationally adoptive families concerning their management of private, adoption-related information. Participants were 166 parents of at least one child adopted from China or Vietnam who responded to an open-ended online questionnaire. Most parents described at least one change in coordination of their child’s private, adoption-related information over time. Of the catalysts that prompted these changes, 43% were due to the child’s development, 30% to the parent’s lived experiences, and 15% to privacy turbulence. Parents reported a variety of motivations for privacy management before and after these changes. Expressive need represented 64% of the pre-change motivations. Control (45%) and preventing hurt (36%) represented the predominant post-change motivations. Significant to CPM, these accounts show parents acting as proxy owners for their young children and demonstrate developmental changes in privacy management within families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalCommunication Quarterly
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

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