Body size, temperature, and seasonal differences in size structure influence the occurrence of cannibalism in larvae of the migratory dragonfly, Anax junius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that body size and seasonal differences in temperature and size structure influence cannibalism in larval dragonflies. In the first two experiments, larvae that were either similar or different in size were paired to examine the potential for intra- and intercohort cannibalism. In the third experiment, size structure of an assemblage of larvae and water temperature were manipulated to explore the seasonal dynamics of cannibalism. Cannibalism was common between individuals that differed in body size by one or more instars. Cannibalism also occurred between individuals similar in size but the rate varied across developmental stages. Results suggest that cannibalism may be most common when water temperatures are warm and late-instar larvae are present at high densities. These results highlight the importance of intra- and intercohort cannibalism as factors that can influence the population dynamics of generalist predators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)761-770
Number of pages10
JournalAquatic Ecology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Body size, temperature, and seasonal differences in size structure influence the occurrence of cannibalism in larvae of the migratory dragonfly, Anax junius'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this