Beliefs about sleep and perceived sleep quality are associated with quality of life among perimenopausal women

Danielle Arigo, Jacqueline D. Kloss, Kathryn Kniele, Kelly Gilrain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sleep disturbance is a common complaint among perimenopausal women and is hypothesized to contribute to compromises in their quality of life (QoL). We investigated the degree to which sleep disturbance and QoL were related and whether dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep were significantly associated with QoL ratings among a community sample of 168 perimenopausal women (88% return rate). Questionnaires included measures of subjective sleep quality, beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and QoL. Subjective sleep quality accounted for a significant amount of variance in both the physical and mental health aspects of QoL. Dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep significantly accounted for the physical components of QoL but not mental components. The interplay among sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and QoL is discussed, as well as potential clinical implications and ideas for future investigations specific to perimenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-255
Number of pages15
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

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