African American Students’ Academic and Web Programming Self-Efficacy, Learning Performance, and Perceptions towards Computer Programming in Web Design Courses

Yu Tung Kuo, Yu Chun Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Computer programming has been included in computer literacy education in many countries in the last decade. This study examined the effects of gender and the prior programming experience of computer programming on academic and web programming self-efficacy and learning performance in the web design course among African American students, as well as their perceptions towards computer programming. This study’s 14-week web design course taught African American students multiple web programming languages, including HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, in order. A one-group pretest–posttest design was adopted in the experiment. The quantitative method was primarily used in data analysis. This study revealed that African American students’ academic and web programming self-efficacy significantly increased after the web design course. Most of the African American students’ perceptions of computer programming became positive after attending the web design course. This study also found that male African American students had a significantly higher level of web programming self-efficacy than female students before the web design course. Interestingly, this difference disappeared after the course. Additionally, both gender and prior experience in computer programming did not significantly affect students’ learning performance in the web design course. The findings of this study not only contribute to the understanding of the feasibility of teaching multiple programming languages in web programming courses for African American students, they also provide evidence of the positive influence of web programming on African American students’ perceptions of computer programming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1236
JournalEducation Sciences
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Public Administration
  • Computer Science Applications

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