Acute in-vivo testing of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO)

J. F. Golob, W. J. Federspiel, T. L. Merrill, B. J. Frankowski, H. J. Russian, K. Litwak, B. G. Hattler

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Current treatment for acute respiratory failure (ARF) includes the use of mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), both of which can exacerbate lung injury. Intravascular oxygenation, using hollow fiber membranes placed in the vena cava, represents a possible support modality for treatment of ARF, while avoiding ventilator induced trauma and other problems. Our group has been actively developing the Intravenous Membrane Oxygenator (IMO), which consists of a constrained fiber bundle with a centrally located balloon. The balloon can be pulsated rapidly to decrease diffusional transfer resistance at the fibers, and increase gas exchange. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the IMO performance during acute implantation in the vena cava and compare performance to that achieved in previous ex-vivo loop studies. The IMO was implanted into four calves via the external jugular vein and placed in the superior and inferior vena cava spanning the right atrium. Gas exchange, hemodynamics and hematological parameters were assessed as balloon pulsation rates were varied from 30 to 300 beats/minute. Post insertion cardiac output ranged from 10 to 14L/minute with less than a 10% reduction pre versus post seen in each experiment. Maximum CO2 exchange rate occurred at the highest pulsation rate and averaged 327±15 ml/min/m2, similar to levels achieved in our ex-vivo studies. The rate of CO2 transfer with no pulsation was 251±28ml/min/m2. Balloon pulsation enhanced gas exchange less during acute implantation than in our ex-vivo loop studies, which can be attributed to the higher flow rates past the device seen in acute implantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalASAIO Journal
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Event46th Annual Conference and Exposition of ASAIO - New York, NY, USA
Duration: Jun 28 2000Jul 1 2000

Fingerprint

Oxygenators
Membrane Oxygenators
Balloons
Venae Cavae
Gases
Membranes
Respiratory Insufficiency
Testing
Oxygenation
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Superior Vena Cava
Jugular Veins
Inferior Vena Cava
Lung Injury
Mechanical Ventilators
Fibers
Heart Atria
Artificial Respiration
Cardiac Output
Hemodynamics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Golob, J. F., Federspiel, W. J., Merrill, T. L., Frankowski, B. J., Russian, H. J., Litwak, K., & Hattler, B. G. (2000). Acute in-vivo testing of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO). ASAIO Journal, 46(2). https://doi.org/10.1097/00002480-200003000-00119
Golob, J. F. ; Federspiel, W. J. ; Merrill, T. L. ; Frankowski, B. J. ; Russian, H. J. ; Litwak, K. ; Hattler, B. G. / Acute in-vivo testing of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO). In: ASAIO Journal. 2000 ; Vol. 46, No. 2.
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Golob, JF, Federspiel, WJ, Merrill, TL, Frankowski, BJ, Russian, HJ, Litwak, K & Hattler, BG 2000, 'Acute in-vivo testing of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO)', ASAIO Journal, vol. 46, no. 2. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002480-200003000-00119

Acute in-vivo testing of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO). / Golob, J. F.; Federspiel, W. J.; Merrill, T. L.; Frankowski, B. J.; Russian, H. J.; Litwak, K.; Hattler, B. G.

In: ASAIO Journal, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.01.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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T1 - Acute in-vivo testing of the intravenous membrane oxygenator (IMO)

AU - Golob, J. F.

AU - Federspiel, W. J.

AU - Merrill, T. L.

AU - Frankowski, B. J.

AU - Russian, H. J.

AU - Litwak, K.

AU - Hattler, B. G.

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - Current treatment for acute respiratory failure (ARF) includes the use of mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), both of which can exacerbate lung injury. Intravascular oxygenation, using hollow fiber membranes placed in the vena cava, represents a possible support modality for treatment of ARF, while avoiding ventilator induced trauma and other problems. Our group has been actively developing the Intravenous Membrane Oxygenator (IMO), which consists of a constrained fiber bundle with a centrally located balloon. The balloon can be pulsated rapidly to decrease diffusional transfer resistance at the fibers, and increase gas exchange. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the IMO performance during acute implantation in the vena cava and compare performance to that achieved in previous ex-vivo loop studies. The IMO was implanted into four calves via the external jugular vein and placed in the superior and inferior vena cava spanning the right atrium. Gas exchange, hemodynamics and hematological parameters were assessed as balloon pulsation rates were varied from 30 to 300 beats/minute. Post insertion cardiac output ranged from 10 to 14L/minute with less than a 10% reduction pre versus post seen in each experiment. Maximum CO2 exchange rate occurred at the highest pulsation rate and averaged 327±15 ml/min/m2, similar to levels achieved in our ex-vivo studies. The rate of CO2 transfer with no pulsation was 251±28ml/min/m2. Balloon pulsation enhanced gas exchange less during acute implantation than in our ex-vivo loop studies, which can be attributed to the higher flow rates past the device seen in acute implantation.

AB - Current treatment for acute respiratory failure (ARF) includes the use of mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), both of which can exacerbate lung injury. Intravascular oxygenation, using hollow fiber membranes placed in the vena cava, represents a possible support modality for treatment of ARF, while avoiding ventilator induced trauma and other problems. Our group has been actively developing the Intravenous Membrane Oxygenator (IMO), which consists of a constrained fiber bundle with a centrally located balloon. The balloon can be pulsated rapidly to decrease diffusional transfer resistance at the fibers, and increase gas exchange. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the IMO performance during acute implantation in the vena cava and compare performance to that achieved in previous ex-vivo loop studies. The IMO was implanted into four calves via the external jugular vein and placed in the superior and inferior vena cava spanning the right atrium. Gas exchange, hemodynamics and hematological parameters were assessed as balloon pulsation rates were varied from 30 to 300 beats/minute. Post insertion cardiac output ranged from 10 to 14L/minute with less than a 10% reduction pre versus post seen in each experiment. Maximum CO2 exchange rate occurred at the highest pulsation rate and averaged 327±15 ml/min/m2, similar to levels achieved in our ex-vivo studies. The rate of CO2 transfer with no pulsation was 251±28ml/min/m2. Balloon pulsation enhanced gas exchange less during acute implantation than in our ex-vivo loop studies, which can be attributed to the higher flow rates past the device seen in acute implantation.

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