A randomized controlled trial of Koru: A mindfulness program for college students and other emerging adults

Jeffrey M. Greeson, Michael K. Juberg, Margaret Maytan, Kiera James, Holly Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants: Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. It was hypothesized that Koru, compared with a wait-list control group, would reduce perceived stress and sleep problems, and increase mindfulness, self-compassion, and gratitude. Results: As hypothesized, results showed significant Group (Koru, Wait-List) × Time (Pre, Post) interactions for improvements in perceived stress (F[1, 76.40]=4.50, p = .037, d = .45), sleep problems (F [1, 79.49] = 4.71, p = .033, d = .52), mindfulness (F [1, 79.09] = 26.80, p < .001, d = .95), and self-compassion (F[1, 74.77] = 18.08, p < .001, d = .75). All significant effects were replicated in the wait-list group. Significant correlations were observed among changes in perceived stress, sleep problems, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Conclusions: Results support the effectiveness of the Koru program for emerging adults in the university setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-233
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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